Tips To Taking Care Your Plant

Thanks to our science classes in elementary school, we can easily recite the essentials for plant survival: sunlight, water, air and nutrients. Since air is all around us, we will look at how we can, through simple ways, ensure our plants are properly cared for in the other remaining three respects.

Sunlight

Imagine going to bed hungry. Not fun, is it? That’s how it is for plants that receive insufficient sunlight. Needles to say, this is because sunlight enables plants to photosynthesize, or make food. However, not every plant will thrive when simply placed under the glaring sun. Different plants require different amounts and intensity of sunlight. The different categories of sunlight plants normally fall into are:

  • Direct: sunlight reaches the plant directly without any obstruction
  • Indirect: sunlight shines around the plant but not directly on it
  • Diffused: sunlight is filtered through a light drapery before reaching the plant

Be sure to arrange your plants accordingly. When selecting plants for your home, select those which will be able to grow well in the sunlight you can provide.

Water

Plants, like us, require water to survive. This does not mean you make flower pots and beds overflow with water. As with anything, too much of anything is never good. Overwatering is actually one of the most common mistakes that can lead to a bigger problem for gardeners. When you add water to the soil and it does not get drained properly, the soil becomes waterlogged. Oxygen, the third basic need of plants, is then cut off for the roots, which then leads to the damage, decay and eventual death of the plant.

So, how much should you water? The answer lies in the type of plant you are growing. Like the level of sunlight a plant should get, the amount of moisture it needs also varies with different plants. Some plant species like to have moist soil in between waterings, while others prefer a dry soil. Consult your vendor to find out the level of moisture your plant roots need and keep up with the routine. Here are some helpful tips for plant watering:

  • Stick your finger into the soil and push downwards to gauge how moist the soil is. You can aim for an almost-dry-but-still-moist soil before watering. This is important for wilting plants which may not require the excessive water you’re giving.
  • Water thoroughly but not excessively, so roots at the bottom get water too.
  • Use lukewarm water for watering as cold water can shock the roots.
  • Place saucers below flower pots so water can drain off, and empty them when filled.
  • Water more during the warm seasons than in the cold seasons (but only as necessary).
  • Water newly planted shrubs and trees more frequently as they will not have developed deep root systems yet.

Nutrients

While plants can grow without feeding, containerized plants can benefit from it. Plants in garden beds can take up nutrients available in the soil but those without any resources have to be fed with fertilizers. Flowering plants are a group that will hugely benefit from feeding. Soils can also vary in the levels of nutrients they provide so rather than adding fertilizers, the situation may require special attention to the factors affecting the soil. Here are some tips for feeding your plants with fertilizers:

  • Make sure the soil in moist when applying fertilizers.
  • Feed plants when they show symptoms of nutrient deficiency.
  • Feed plants when they are producing a lower than expected yield while still looking healthy.
  • Feed during the growing season (spring/summer).
  • Don’t apply fertilizers to compacted soil which may end up ineffective.

Now that you’ve got your basics right, you can start growing healthy green plants in your home.

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All About Organic Rose Plant

How Nature Works

Whether it is roses, other flower gardening, or just about any type of plant, the secret to successful organic gardening of any kind is to understand the way nature works. Nature always tries to maintain a delicate balance. By understanding the basics of how plants grow, you will understand how to maintain nature’s balance and thus keep your roses healthy. Basically, water and nutrients are absorbed into the root system and pulled up through the stems into the green leaves by the process of photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is a plant process that uses water and energy from the sun to convert carbon dioxide into carbohydrates that it uses for growth and other plant functions. The carbohydrates are stored in the branches and stems of roses, trees, and other plants. These stored carbohydrates are used as reserve energy for the plant. When a crises occurs, such as a broken stem or pathogenic attack, the stored carbohydrates are used. Stored carbohydrates are also used in the spring to create new stems and foliage. A natural soil environment teems with bacteria, fungi, nematodes, earthworms, and other soil organisms. Many of these soil organisms break down dead leaves and other materials into humus, which enriches the soil. Other soil organisms form symbiotic relationships with roses and other plants.

A symbiotic relationship is a relationship that is beneficial to all participants in the relationship. Mycorrhizal fungus creates an important symbiotic relation with roses and other plants. Mycorrhiza attaches itself to the roots of your roses and other plants. It uses some of the carbohydrates stored by your plants to grow, but helps your roses and other plants by making minerals more available. In a healthy soil environment, the mycorrhizae attached to one of your roses will grow and become interconnected to the mycorrhizae of other roses and plants. In effect, it provides a secondary root system for your garden plants. Roses and other plants also release exudates from their roots that attract beneficial organisms. As an example, exudates from rose roots attract friendly bacterium that ward off pathogenic fungi. Beneficial soil organisms, which are found in natural humus and compost, also make minerals more available to your roses and other plants. Beneficial soil organisms also help protect roses and other plants from predatory life forms.

Another important thing to understand is that plants of all kinds are a little bit like humans–some get along very well and some don’t. Some plants grow well together and actually help each other survive. Other plants inhibit neighboring plants. Plants that grow well together are referred to as companion plants. Companion plants are an important factor in any garden. We will talk more about them later.

Organic growers recognize that pathogenic attacks are an indication that the plant or plants are out of balance. Organic growers know that pathogens can’t get a foothold on a healthy plant. Commonly used chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides destroy soil organisms and throw roses, flowers, and other plants out of balance. The imbalance created by these chemicals attracts pathogens.

Our meddling also creates havoc in roses and other plants. Over-pruning reduces carbohydrate storage, throws the plant out of balance, and often opens the door to pathogens. Hybridization often creates weaker plants. The practice of grafting rose stems onto a different root stock often creates roses that are susceptible to pathogenic attacks.

Creating Your Own Rose Garden If you want to plant a rose garden that consists of two or three roses, or a whole bunch of roses, you need to begin planning. The first thing to do is to think about where you want to plant your roses and what colors you might like. Be sure to consider the other colors in your yard, as well as your house, walkways, etc. Roses grow best with a minimum of six hours of full sun, although some varieties can tolerate a bit more shade. Your shade/full sun areas will affect your possible rose garden locations. The next thing to do is to find out what roses grow well in your climate. Look at rose gardens in your local area to see what roses seem to grow well and how much you like them. Ask nursery experts what roses grow well in your area. Another good source is your local rose club. This will give you a good idea of the colors, sizes, and other characteristics that will grow well in your area.

Companion Plants Once you have decided on the roses you like, you need to learn about companion plants. Roses really do love garlic, as well as other plants of the onion family. Onions are of the order Asparaginales and family Alliaceae. The onion family is made up of 500 species. Although planting garlic in your rose garden will help protect your roses, there are many other onion varieties that will protect your roses and also provide beautiful flowers to enhance your roses. Marigolds, mignonettes, and thyme are also good companions for roses. When you are deciding on companion plants for roses, check to see when they bloom. Other characteristics, such as texture and height, should also be considered before deciding on your companion plants. An excellent book on companion planting is Roses Love Garlic by Louise Riotte. Here’s an interesting link about companion planting.

Choosing Your Plants Choose hardy roses. Generally, old varieties of roses are the hardiest. Try to pick roses that haven’t been grafted onto a different root stock. Choose the colors you like. Bare-root roses are less expensive than potted roses, but potted roses are easier to plant and more likely to survive Choose flowers from the onion family, or other companion families that will complement your roses. Once you have chosen your colors and plants, and have decided how to arrange them and what your rose garden will look like, you can dig in and begin working with your soil.

Soil Soil is the key to healthy and beautiful roses. Dig into your rose plot in several places to see what the soil it is like. Soil is seldom perfect. It may have too much clay, too much sand, tons of rocks, or any of a dozen different problems. pH is also important. You should test your soil pH. pH kits are available at nurseries and over the internet. A good pH test kit is worth the expense because inexpensive ones are often inaccurate. Most roses grow well with a soil pH of 5.5 to 7, although a pH of 6.5 is ideal. pH is a measure of acid-base balance and uses a scale of 1 to 14. 1 is extremely acid; 7 is neutral; and 14 is extremely basic (alkaline). Few flowers will grow in a pH that is too acid or too alkaline. A pH of 6.5 is the point where nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium, plus trace minerals, are most easily available to your flowers. Arid regions tend to have alkaline soils and regions with heavy rainfall tend to have acidic soils.

How Much To Water Roses Roses like a lot of water during the growing and blooming season. But this doesn’t mean give them a small amount every day. Like with watering other plants, it is better to water deeply rather than just a little bit at a time, so that the water can fully penetrate the roots. Just sprinkling them with the hose is not enough. Let the hose give your roses a full, thorough soaking. A good four or five gallons worth of water per rose bush is a basic rule of thumb. Depending on how much rain your garden gets, a deep watering once a week is usually enough even in drier parts of the country. If it is extremely hot and dry, perhaps every four days or so. Avoid watering during the heat of the day in direct sunlight. Early morning and late afternoon are the best times to water.

The Magic of Humus If your soil is out of the correct pH range, you can change it. This is where the magic of soil biology creates miracles. Humus is the magic formula for most soil problems. Humus, which you can create by composting with compost bins, will help improve your soil pH. It will also improve soil that is too sandy, has too much clay, or has other problems. If your soil is extremely acid, which can happen in an area with heavy rainfall, or soil that has had overdoses of chemical N-P-K fertilizer, you may need to add limestone to “sweeten” the soil. For most other soil problems, humus is the answer. You may not have humus available. If that is the case, don’t worry. We will discuss how mulching can help your roses. For more information on composting, see the Composting Guide. You can create compost with plant clippings and other yard debris, rather than throwing them away. They will provide you with a continuous supply of humus in the future. You should be careful if you decide to purchase compost. Many compost products are not fully composted and are still too ‘hot’ for your garden. Organic fertilizers should be added during the growing cycle. You can even find special organic rose fertilizer that is designed specifically with rose gardening in mind.

Planting Roses It is best to plant your roses between spring and early summer so that they have time to develop a root system before winter sets in. Roses don’t like to be crowded, so give them enough room. Hybrid teas, grand floras, and floribundas should be planted 18 to 30 inches apart. Climbers should be planted 8 to 12 feet apart. Miniatures can be planted approximately 12 to 15 inches apart.

If you have container roses, make sure they have been watered and keep them wet while working. Dig holes for your roses that are 2 ½ times the size of the root ball. It is a good idea to put some well composted organic matter in the bottom of the hole. Mix more composted matter with the soil that you removed, but are planning to put back in the hole. If you don’t have composted matter available, you can substitute a good quality planting mix. It is best to use planting mix that doesn’t contain chemical fertilizers, although it is sometimes difficult to find.

Take the rose plant out of the container and put the rose plant in the hole. Pack the prepared dirt under and around the rose, making sure that the dirt on the top of the rose root-ball is level with the ground. It is a good idea to put a straight stick across the hole to make sure the dirt level of the rose is the same as the ground level. If your rose is planted above or below ground level, it may have a difficult time growing properly. Planting bare-root roses is the same process, except that you must gently pack the dirt around the roots. If you have a grafted rose, you need to make sure that the graft union is a little bit below ground level.

Purchasing organic rose fertilizer will insure that you have fertilizer to add during the growing season, if you don’t already have it on hand at home.

Mulch Mulching will help your roses after they are planted. Mulching is the practice of adding plant material, such as leaves, dead grass, or shredded bark on top of the soil. The plant material will eventually be broken down and pulled into the soil by soil denizens. It will become humus. Mulching also helps to retain moisture in the soil. In a natural environment, leaves fall to the ground and stay there. They act as mulch

Pruning You will not need to prune your roses until next season. It is best to prune just before the early spring growth appears, which is March in most areas. You can check with your local nurseries to find out what is the best time in your area. If you are unfamiliar with pruning, it is best to watch a demonstration. There are many articles and books that explain how to prune, but a demonstration is worth ten thousand words. Do-it-yourself television shows often give demonstrations. Nurseries and rose clubs also sometimes give demonstrations. Once you see a demonstration, you will feel much more comfortable with the idea of pruning.

Deadheading If you have planted repeat-flowering roses, your rose bushes will bloom more bountifully when you remove the spent blooms. This is called deadheading.

Tips Hybrid tea roses or grand floras are best for classical long stem roses, but floribundas, shrubs, or climbing roses are a better choice if you want your rose garden to bloom continually. Climbers on a trellis can create an amazing display of color or hide an unsightly shed. Roses need well-drained soil. If you have clay, or other soil that doesn’t drain, you may have to create a drain line or plant your roses in a raised bed. Don’t forget mulch. Mulching around your roses and other plants will make them very happy and reduce pathogen problems. Purchase hardy roses that are resistant to infestation. These are often the older varieties. You will also find that sturdy varieties vary from region to region. Check with local organic gardening associations to find out what works best in your specific area and under your specific conditions. Instead of planting your roses in even rows, you can stagger them. By staggering them, you get more roses in a small space without crowing them.

Many people are now getting into growing all things organic. Farmers are doing it with produce and meats, so it is natural that you might want to grow your roses that way also. Many people have problems using the pesticides and insecticides that go along with growing roses and keeping them healthy. Well, now you can use more natural methods of growing your roses. I will show you how in step by step detail.

1. Each bush that you want to plant will need to have a foot of space all around it so that the flowers can get the proper amount of circulation. It also helps to prevent leaf diseases for your roses.

2. You will want to purchase organic roses. You will want to buy roses that have a sturdy green stem and no blemishes on them. Bare root roses are best for this.

3. Along with roses that have green stems, you will need to look for stems that have evenly spaced leaves that are close together.

4. You will need to use well drained soil so that you can promote the healthy growth that will give the flower all of the water and nutrients that it needs from the root to the flower’s head.

5. Fix the soil so that you can build organically. You should use a raised bead if drainage is a constant problem. Ask your local garden center rep about how best to fix your soil to be organically correct.

6. Soak your bare root roses in a large container of composte tea for many hours before you plant them.

7. You must mound up enough good organic sol that is mixed with an equal amount of composte in the middle so that you can spread the roots out and down from where they meet at the trunk.

8. Now, plant the rose at the point where the stem breaks into the root so that it is at soil level, or approximately 1 inch below the top level if you live in an area that is prone to hard winters. 9. You have to check your bare root roses first. If your roots grow out in a tight circle, you have to cut a straight slice down each of its four sides. A knife is good for this. Then you will dig a hole that is 2 inches deeper than the container and at least twice as wide.

10. Mix your organic soil garden soil with an equal amount of composted and use your hands to gently spread the roots into the soil mix.

11. You have to mulch to help you prevent your roses from being exposed to weeds, and water stress complications. It will also ensure that your roses remain at their lowest possible maintenance level.

12. You must feed your roses organically also. Fertilize with organic fertilizer and maintain a regular watering schedule.

13. Water your organic roses deep at the planting, and then once every week after that during growing season so that you can promote deep roots. Watering in the early morning is best.

14. You must cultivate the top inch of your soil around each of your roses and fertilize on a monthly basis with a balanced organic fertilizer. You will need a good granular type of fertilizer that you can work into the soil. Either that, or you can use a fish emulsion or seaweed based product that you can mix with water because it has all of the necessary nutrients that a healthy flower needs. Check the ingredients listed on the labels to ensure that they have nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, iron and calcium.

15. To help protect your bed against the various types of pests and insects that can plague your roses, put sticky yellow bars every ten feet to catch them.

16. You may use an organic pesticide if the problem is bad.

17. If your pest problem is severe enough, you may use insecticidal soap to spray over your roses.

Now you have all of the necessary knowledge that you need to grow your own bed of earth friendly roses. Your flowers will be just as beautiful as those that are not grown organically, and will likely have the healthiest life span that a rose can get. Organic roses have some of the best color and “immune systems” that a rose can have. The fragrance of them can’t be beaten.

CALENDAR OF ROSE CARE

SPRING

Fertilize with blood and bone, up to 1 kg per bush, depending on soil fertility, mixed with 100g of sulphate of potash per bush, potash improves disease resistance (don’t use muriate of potash, it has a harmful effect on beneficial soil organisms). Apply a good mulch of well-rotted compost and lucerne hay.

Spray new foliage in the afternoon with seaweed, repeat every 10-14 days

SUMMER

Fertilize repeat bloomers in mid to late summer

Fertilize again with 100g of sulphate of potash per bush

AUTUMN

In the subtropics, hybrid tea and floribundas should be hard-pruned in February, this gives the plant a rest and stops flowering in the heat and humidity of the wet season, when flowers will just collapse anyway. Remove all rose pruning’s as they can harbor disease. The plant should be ready to flower again by late March, when it is cooler.

Roses often flower well from March to July, remove spent blooms on a regular basis.

Fertilize again with blood and bone and 100g of sulphate of potash per bush WINTER

In cool areas this is the main period for pruning.

Trim bushes lightly in August, before the cold westerly winds start blowing.

Spray with lime sulphur or Bordeaux mixture to kill fungal spores.

Dust the soil with lime to provide calcium.

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Choosing Plants For Your Indoor Garden

The most important thing to remember when you want to begin an indoor garden is that you purchase the right kind of plant and / or plants. This article will introduce you to several kinds of plants for indoor gardens, making your garden easier to maintain, and definitely more beautiful to observe. There are many great ideas for indoor plants – you just have to know what you are looking for. I will help you out.

Sometimes you do not have outdoor space for a garden but desperately want one nonetheless. Or, perhaps you already have a beautiful outdoor garden and because you enjoy the ambiance so much you want to be able to enjoy it all year-round. In addition, you can impress your friends and family members and any other guests with the distinct and decorative look of an indoor garden in your home.

Whether you want to transform the overall look of your home, whether you simply have no space outdoors, or whether you just want to enjoy the ambiance of garden foliage all year round, you need to find the very best plants. If you want a low maintenance plant and /or plants, here are some great ideas:

The Bromeliad is a beautiful plant with a bright, fragrant bloom that lasts longer than the blossoming period of a typical plant, whether the plant is indoors or whether it Is outdoors. It will easily enhance the overall décor and ambiance of your home – you will immediately be able to see the difference an indoor garden can make.

The Pothos is a very popular indoor garden plant. It is also referred to as Epiremnum aureum, Phothos aureus, Raphidorphora aureum, or Scindaspus aureus. The name of this plant changes all the time – even among the scientific community. Nonetheless, all terms refer to the same, lovely, indoor home plant. They are very interesting plants, featuring golden yellow to white shades. They are heart-shaped vine (ivy-like) leaves that flourish beautifully and require very little maintenance.

Another great example of a low maintenance indoor plant is the spider plant. A friend of mine has one of these (who, I must mention, has a real knack for killing plants) and I can testify that they are very difficult to kill. A spider plant makes great house-warming gift for a friend or family member. The spider plant likes to have medium sunlight – which is simple to achieve – even when there is very little direct sunlight that comes through your windows.

The snake plant is another great example of easy maintenance indoor gardening plant. The only real problem that most people with snake plants face is death by over watering. That makes it nice. You don’t have to remember to water as often as you would with other kinds of plants. The snake plant has very low light requirements than many other plants indoors and outdoors – therefore, it is suitable for virtually any indoor environment.

Of course, there are other indoor plants that require just a bit more care than those I mentioned above. These are for people who want to improve their indoor gardens and are willing to push just a little more effort. These are plants such as the Sword Fern, the Dragon Tree, or the Jade plant. It all depends on the plants that best suit your personal taste.

The Jade plant is a lovely addition to practically any home garden. Nonetheless, these plants want a fairly strong amount of sun light. These are very popular feng shui plants. Unfortunately, these plants are very susceptible for the mealybug to reside – especially if it is not taken care of. If the Jade Plant begins to decline, the more easily it will die. If it is kept healthy and if mealbug infestation is prevented, your plant will have a long and happy life.

Sword Ferns are known to be tolerant of an incredibly wide variety of dryer conditions than most ferns require. Perfect for a home in the desert or somewhere else where the humidity is low, the Sword Fern is a beautiful addition to the home. It will change your home décor and the ambiance of your living space, whether you have an outdoor garden, room for an outdoor garden, or space for plants only inside.

Dragon Trees are also a medium maintenance indoor plant. They can live for a long time, and grow to be a virtually permanent part of your home décor. The genus of Dragon Trees tends to be most happy in dryer and lighter conditions but they are adaptable to many kinds of home, office or apartment space. There are many places where you have probably seen Dragon Trees. You may see it again and realize you really like the look. It is a great way to enhance your home, garden or office space.

So we move on . . . here are the tough ones. These are the indoor plants that will need some TLC, nonetheless the plants you pamper will improve the striking allure of an indoor garden more and more beautiful than the indoor plants that are easier to take care of. These are indoor plants such as Orchids and Bonsai Trees. Orchids such as Epiphytic plants, Psuedobulbs and Terrestrial orchids are very popular among the kinds of higher maintenance indoor plants available.

Bonsai trees can create such a wonderful ambiance in someone’s home. The feng shui attributes are unlike any other. It is like having your own, living miniature forest, whether you have three trees or five. Nonetheless, the Bonsai will require much of your attention and care. An indoor Bonsai garden can be designed in many ways. For example: set up your trees among a small pebble garden raked in circular patterns or designs. Or you can have a garden indoors with little trees arranged on a cascade of stones or granite. It’s your choice.

Orchids are also luxurious and alluring indoor garden plants. Elegant indoor orchids require much love and care (you have to pay attention to them for sure) but boy are they worth it. There are many beautiful orchids available for indoor garden home décor, but be sure to follow the care instructions exactly as they are laid out for you. In addition, do not hesitate to consult a gardening expert about your specific kind of orchids and how to keep them as healthy as possible for as long as possible.

You can have a beautiful garden indoors all year round! Fragrant and stunning, elegant and incredibly impressive, the indoor garden of your personal design could be the most wonderful part of the overall ambiance of your home décor. From simple to maintain and inexpensive plants, to difficult, beautiful plants for your home décor, find excellent kinds of indoor garden plants perfect for you! Why not find the most beautiful plants for your indoor garden? You will be surprised at the difference it makes.

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Organic Blueberry Plants

Introduction
You have always wanted a great looking landscape to brighten the yard. But who has time to spend every free minute caring for the yard? With some planning and a little know how it is easy to cut down on the drudgery of yard work. Having an easy care landscape means you must develop a realistic plan. Trees and shrubs give substance to a landscape and flowers provide excitement and surprise. You can enjoy the fruits of near effortless edibles including blueberries and strawberries. Blueberries are a low maintenance plant. They have few pest and are native to North America. They require a soil pH of 4.6 to 5.1.

Take a look at your landscape
Knowing the physical characteristics of your site, the soil, climate, topography, and exposure is a vital part creating and maintaining a low maintenance landscape. Choose well adapted plants to design a functional, attractive layout for your yard.

Some factors like climate you have no control over and it affects your whole yard. Other factors you have some control over, Like the amount of shade which can differ widely in different parts of the yard. Growing plants can be a breeze if you have deep, fertile soil rich in organic matter. But even if you don’t (very few of us do) you can still have a productive low maintenance yard. You can decide to improve your soil by adding organic matter or using raised beds and adjusting the soil pH if needed. You can also look for plants that are adapted to your soils existing conditions. Raised beds can provide ideal growing conditions for a variety of vegetables, bushes, and flowers. Where the soil has poor drainage raised beds can solve that problem.

Test your soil. Your local extension service can provide a test for a sample you supply. Test results will tell you the soils fertility, pH, and organic matter content. Getting your soil in shape before planting will go a long way toward promoting healthy, trouble-free plants in the future.

Reduce maintenance on tough to mow slopes by replacing turf with a mixture of low care flowers and shrubs such as low growing easy maintenance blueberry bushes and using a mowing strip. For example, North Country blueberry plants grows 18 to 24 inches tall or North blue blueberry plants that grows to a height of 20-30 inches could be good selections.

Lawns
Reduce mowing chores by replacing some of the lawn with shrubs, trees or ground cover. Eliminate grass growing under or along fences and walls and low branching trees. The kind of grass you grow has a lot to do with how much maintenance it requires. There are grasses that do not grow tall and thus require minimal mowing.

For example, No mow grass ultra low maintenance grass. Eliminate hours of lawn mowing and lawn maintenance each month with Pearl’s Premium grass. Pearl’s Premium grows slowly above ground. Below ground, it can put down 12″ roots, tapping into naturally occurring moisture and nutrients. This type of grass will reduce watering requirements and a lot of mowing. Mow only when it needs it not on a regular weekly or bi-weekly schedule.

End edging forever- For the busy person trees, shrubs and flower beds can quickly turn into a night mare. The shaggy edges that form between planting and the lawn area can give any area an unkempt look and be a real pain to trim. Mowing strips are the solution. A mowing strip is a flat band of brick or flat rock that sits flush with the soil surface and you just mow over the area eliminating the need for the hand or string trimmers to cut the grass at the edge of the of the bed. You just let one wheel ride on the strip and the other on the lawn.

Ground cover
Utilizing ground cover can help to change a bare or dull part of your yard into a beautiful, low maintenance show area. Low growing ground cover plants can serve you well in some areas. For example in our yard we had a rock area that we could not mow and looked ugly. We let low growing ground cover plants grow over this area to transform it into a beautiful area that required essentially no care. You might consider RUBY CARPET a ground cover blueberry plant. The height of the ruby Carpet plants grow to be 4 to 6 inches at maturity and spread outward to create the Red Carpet. Ruby Carpet is selected for form, color and resistance to dryer soil conditions than most blueberry plants.

Blueberries make a beautiful delicious Landscape
When planting blueberries as part of your landscape you should consider combining them with other plants that thrive in acid soil such as azaleas, rhododendrons and camellias. The following are some example of plants you can consider.

Legacy blueberry plants grows 4 to 5 feet tall and can create 4 seasons of interest in your landscape. Spring brings white flowers that develop into shiny green fruit which turn bright blue in the summer. Smooth, glossy-green leaves look attractive all spring & summer in the fall they produce beautiful orange-red leaves.
Sunshine blue is a short plant that is very suitable for growing in a landscape or in containers.
Ornablue grows about 3 feet tall and is considered to be the best ornamental of its size and stature.
North Country grows 18 to 24 inches tall and is an outstanding blueberry plant for landscapes and container growing.
North blue, grows to a height of 20-30 inches. It is good for landscapes and container growing. It’s large glossy, dark green leaves turn dark red in the fall making it of good ornamental value.
Patriot grows 3 to 5 feet tall and is also an excellent container and landscape variety. It is also a very good producer of fruit.
For tall hedges you want to use for privacy use the faster growing, upright varieties such as Jersey, or Ozark Blue. To make solid hedges or screens, place plants 2½ to 3′ apart.
Rabbiteyes grow tall so they can make excellent plants for areas you want to screen off for privacy. Tifblue is considered among best rabbiteyes.
Blueberry plants grow slowly, and grow about a half-foot a year on mature branches. The plants are multi-stemmed with new shoots often developing from the base.

Eatable landscaping
Recently edible landscaping has received more attention. Part of the reason is because of the well documented health benefits and another is because of the economics of growing your own fruit and vegetables. Raised beds can provide an excellent controllable space to grow blueberry bushes and vegetables. Anyone who has eaten really fresh produce knows a food-producing garden is worth the effort. It is surprising that it hasn’t caught on earlier. It’s such a brilliant way of taking advantage of the little bit of land that many of us have but usually use strictly for ornamentals. Blueberries make a beautiful delicious Landscape. Blueberry plants can serve as ornamentals while also being grown as a food source.

Border plantings and along Walkways
You can plant shrubs along the borders of your property that can serve several purposes. Serve for privacy, eliminate grass growing under or along fences and the related mowing problems, serve as perimeter border to define your property boundaries while at the same time beautifying you landscape. If you use eatable bushes such as blueberry bushes you are can grow blueberries for your health and enjoyment. Ornablue blueberry plant can serve this purpose well and is considered to be the best ornamental varieties of its size and stature.

Border plantings along walkways or surrounding a planting bed can work well, choose Sunshineblue, Ornablue or Northcountry. These can be planted along with dwarf rhododendrons or compact azaleas. All three of these blueberry bushes will grow well in Kentucky. Ornablue is considered to be the best ornamental variety of its size and stature. Northcountry will grow well all the way up to growing zone 3. The Sunshine blue blueberries we planted on our properties in Kentucky and Tennessee have turned out to be pretty much evergreen bushes the year around. Rhododendrons and azaleas can be planted along with blueberry plants to blend into borders or serve as a prickly hedge.

Choosing Blueberry Plants to grow
Purchase your plants state-inspected reliable nursery. Bare root plants are usually sold by most nurseries unless you pick the plants up at the nursery. you obtain plants to be planted in the spring or fall. What is important is to plant them when they’re dormant, either well before or well after they start new growth of leaves, blossoms and berries.

Usually two-year-old potted or bare-root plants are sold by nurseries and are your best purchase. Older plants may give you a harvest sooner, but they are generally not cost-effective because of their added expense and can be harder to establish. Younger plants need to be grown under nursery conditions before they can be planted in the field.

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