Tips To Order Flower Online

Send flowers cheap, don’t send cheap flowers!

When you are short on cash but you want to send someone flowers, don’t try to save money by going to the first online flower delivery service you see and choosing their cheapest floral arrangement, because you’ll end up sending cheap flowers. What you want to do is find the best deal on the nicest flowers, so you end up saving money, but not compromising on quality.

Send Flowers Cheap Tip #1: Order Flowers Online
The way to get the best deal is to order flowers online for delivery. Local florists have huge overhead and sometimes their flowers are not as fresh as you’d like them to be. But when you order online, the flowers are usually coming direct from the grower.

Online flowers are cut that morning, put into your flower arrangement and sent out before they wilt. That means you get the freshest, most inexpensive flowers because there is no middleman. Just a website between you and your flower delivery.

Send Flowers Cheap Tip #2: Choose Weekday Flower Delivery
Deliveries during the week, Monday to Friday can save you a lot of money on delivery charges. Some places, charge way more for Saturday deliveries. Another tip to keep in mind is that most florists don’t work on Sundays, so if you send flowers on Monday, you are likely getting flowers that were cut on Saturday. For the freshest flowers, have them delivered from Tuesday to Friday.

Send Flowers Cheap Tip #3: Choose Seasonal Flowers
When you browse through a website looking for just the right flower arrangement to send, go directly to the seasonal flowers. It’s usually called, Spring Flowers, or Sale Flowers, or Best Sellers. These flowers are growing strong and lovely right at the time you order so they are the best choice for three reasons. One, there are a lot of those flowers available. Two, they will last longer because flowers are strongest when they are in season. And three, because florists have an abundance of seasonal flowers, they want to sell more. Seasonal flowers are the most inexpensive flowers online.

Send Flowers Cheap Tip #4: Order Early for Special Occasions
Some online flower shops raise their prices around special occasions like Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, Christmas, etc. especially for delivery. But if you place your order at least 7 days before the big day, you can save money on delivery and you can usually get a great deal on the flowers too. The best flower delivery services do not raise their prices during special occasions so you can send flowers cheap for any occasion.

Send Flowers Cheap Tip #5: Buy a Year’s Worth of Flowers at Once
I know it sounds crazy, but more and more online flower delivery services are doing this. They offer monthly gifts, a different flower arrangement every month for a year. They send out the freshest, in season flowers once a month to your recipient. You can personalize the card each month so your recipient doesn’t have to know you bought them all at once. The advantage to this is that you can save a lot of money by buying in bulk. They give you the best deals possible when you order a year’s supply at once. If you don’t follow any of the other tips above, follow this one and send flowers cheap all year long. You’ll be a hero in your recipient’s eyes.

Sending flowers cheap doesn’t have to be difficult especially when you follow these tips and view online product reviews of flower delivery services to find out what real, unbiased customers are saying about the best places to buy flowers online and to send flowers cheap.

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Guide To Growing Herbs Flower

Annual Flowering Herbs

Petunia- (Petunia spp.)

Petunias are tender flowering herbs that adorn the garden with a variety of striking colors such as, red, pink, white, violet or a mixture of white stripped with violet or blue.

They are more attractive when planted closely in flower beds forming a blanket of red or velvet blossoms. Petunias are mostly cultivated in pots or window boxes.

Soil Requirements.

The best soil where petunias are more adaptable is a well-drained, fertile, sandy loam soils.

Propagation.

Petunias are propagated by seeds sown in germinating trays or seed boxes and later on thinned and planted in pots or beds.

Plants in full bloom may be brought inside the house for a day or two but should be exposed to full or partial sunlight to maintain normal growth.

Cock’s Comb – (Celosia argentia cristata )

There are two types of cock’s comb like; dwarf and tall or medium height varieties.

There are as many colors of the rainbow as there are cock’s comb varieties. Most often, the dwarf varieties are planted in group as low borders, while the taller varieties serve as background and foundation planting.

Thee flowers stalks vary in size where the taller ones have bigger clusters.

Propagation.

Cock’s comb are easily propagated by seeds either by direct seeding or transplanted singly by seedlings.

When direct seeding is applied, you should do the thinning to avoid overcrowding of the plants.

Marigold – (Tagetes erecta)

Marigold, a native of Mexico is a member of the sunflower family is a hardy annual, bushy, producing flowers with raised centers of golden-orange petals gradually turning to reddish-brown in the outer petals.

Soil Requirements.

Marigold thrives best in a light loam soil with a good drainage and exposed to full sunlight.

Propagation.

Propagation by seeds is the only method to multiply marigold. They are easy to grow although they seem to disappear in most gardens.

Balsam or Touch-Me-Not – (Impatiens oppositfolia, I. glandulifira )

A native of Africa, balsam or touch-me-not derived its name from its characteristics where the fruits when touch at ripening stage burst even just upon a slight contact.
They have a striking beautiful flowers ranging from pink, white, purple, and red double petalled which resembles the rose flowers.

Soil Requirements.

Balsam usually prefers rich fertile soil with abundant sunlight.

Propagation.

Balsam can easily be germinated by seeds. The seeds easily germinate when touch to the ground.

Carnation – (Dianthus caryophyllus)

Carnations are lovely, double-fringed, fragrant flowers. They are favorites as cut flowers, for borders and beds.

Good as potted plants, carnation, when planted properly blooms 5 to 6 months. They may last for more years if you’ll properly care them and fertilized properly.

Soil Requirements.

The best soil for carnation is a well drained and rich in organic matter soil with a cool climate and enough supply of solar radiation.

Propagation.

Carnation is propagated by seeds sown in germinating trays or seed boxes before they are transferred to individual pots or plots when planted in the field.

Verbena – (Verbena hortensis )

An excellent ground cover because of its compact habit of closely massed of flower heads.

There are three colors of verbena such as, red, purple, and white flowers which are attractive when planted in group as ground cover.

Soil Requirements.

Verbena grows best in a well drained, fertile soil and enough supply of sunshine in high altitudes during its growing period.

Propagation.

It is propagated by seeds when planted in temperate countries. However, they can also be propagated by cuttings where, you have to include the rooted portion of the stem to make a sure growth development.

Periwinkles- (Vinca minor)

Known as chichiricas or tropical periwinkles, they have a white or lavender flowers and said to have medicinal values.

They are excellent as border flowers, flowering hedges or foundation plants along bases of walls, fences and buildings.

They are attractive because they flowers the whole year round. You need less attention in replanting them since they grow vigorously.

The only attention you’ll make is to continuously pinch the tips to keep them bushy and busy producing flowers.

Soil Requirements.

Periwinkles grows in any type of soils especially in a well drained rich in organic matter soil medium.

Propagation.

Propagation by cuttings is ideal for periwinkle but they multiply even faster when grown by seeds.

They prefer to bloom abundantly when exposed to full sunlight, though they also produce flowers in partial shaded areas, but not as good when planted with open sun exposure.

Bachelor’s Button – (Cyntaurea cyanus )

Belongs to the Amaranth or Colitis family, bachelor’s button is also known as butones, butonisan or botoncillo and is relative of cock’s comb, Joseph’s coat and cucharita.

Their flowers varies from purple which dominates of all varieties to white, pink, and orange colors.

Propagation.

The methods used in propagating bachelor’s button is by seeds. They multiply fast and are easy to reproduce.

Perennial Flowering Herbs

Star cluster- (Pentas lanceolata )

A native of Africa, this flowering plant is a newly introduced to the Philippines.

They are an attractive herb with a cluster of red, star-like flowers. Although there are pink, white and lavender varieties, the red is considered the most attractive.

Star cluster becomes shrub reaching a height over seven feet as it develops woody tissues through the years of its growth.

To produce a continuous blooms the whole year round, you have to cut the flower stalks after the flowers have fallen down.

Propagation.

Propagated usually by young cuttings ( the hard or matured stems generally do not develop roots).

Anthurium – (Anthurium andraeanum, A. spp. )

Anthurium,also called flamingo flower because of its showy, waxy bract of flaming, deep red or pink color, often mistaken as the flower, is gaining popularity as a cut flower or potted plant.
When used as cut flower, anthurium lasts for as long as one month which explains why it’s expensive and prized by many florists.

There are a hundred varieties of anthurium scattered in the Philippines, but only a few are truly attractive accepted by florists.

Proper care and watering of anthurium is advised to enhance a continuous flower blooms.

Soil Requirements.

Anthurium thrives best in a well drained rich, sandy loam soils.

They usually favors in a cool climate and high elevations, like Baguio and Bukidnon. However, they can be made to flower just as beautifully in greenhouse or controlled environment.

Propagation.

Propagation is usually done by dividing the suckers or shoots, including some roots.

The newly propagated plants must be placed under the shade until they have recovered and new shoots developed.

You have to avoid anthurium exposure to the noon day sunlight. They are intolerant to too much heat of the sun.

African violet- (Saintpaulia spp.)

A native of Africa as the name implies, also known throughout the world as Saint Paulia by gardeners, this flower plant is loved by many because of its soft, waxy leaves and flowers that stays the whole year round in different shades of blue, white, pink, and purple colors.

This plant loves the morning sunlight. They dies easily when exposed to extreme heat and too much water.

African violets can be grown successfully when grown in pots as well as on screened window boxes.

They can also be grown in greenhouse of which they produce more attractive flowers.

Spanish flag – (Gonioplectus hispanus )

Spanish flag also known as canna or bandera espanola are ideal when you want to establish a new garden and an instant supply of flowers.

They are in handy, bearing a profusion of attractive colored flowers within a few weeks.

Their flowers are numerous from streaked to just plain white, cream, pink, deep red, purple, tangerine, lavender or sometimes a combination of two or more colors.

Spanish flag have numerous hybrids. You can select from among the hybrids you think attracts your interest or plant all them if you wish a colorful flowers in your garden.

If you want to maintain large, continuous flowers the whole year round, you have to cut the stalks which have flowered since they’ll compete for food with the rest of the developing plants. These stems will eventually dies anyway.

Soil Requirements.

Spanish flag grows best in rich, friable, sandy loam to loam soils. However, they also grow well in clay loam soil.

Generally, they produce attractive flowers when planted in an open field with abundant supply of sunlight.

But there are other hybrids that shows an excellent flowers even in partially shaded areas.

Propagation.

The easiest way to propagate Spanish flag is by separation of rhizomes which multiplies easily.

However, seeds may be used in propagation but it will take a long time to bear flowers compared to those propagated by rhizomes.

Red Billbergia- (Billbergia spp. )

A member of the pineapple family, red billbergia have a strikingly beautiful red or pink flowers which blooms during the months of May, June, and November in Luzon, Philippines.

They grows well in partial shade or full sunlight.

Soil Requirements.

Billbergia thrives best with a mixture of soil, ground charcoal, moss and other medium used in planting orchids.

Propagation.

They can be propagated by separation or by division of the young shoots which comes out after the flowers have wilted and the old plants have died.

Camia- (Hedychium philippinense K. Schum. )

Camias are shade loving plants to which they can be grown under trees. Their flowers are white with a fragrant scent which makes them favorite as cut flower and also for corsages or bouquets although they doesn’t stay fresh very long.

Their flowers are numerous during the rainy season and the plants gradually die as the dry season sets in. However, the rhizomes send out new shoots again once the rain starts to pour in.

You should prune the stems which have flowered just above the ground level to induce more flower blooms.

Camias have a cousin called the yellow camia or India Ginger which produce yellow flowers and a native of the Himalayas.

Soil Requirements.

The best soil for camia is sandy or clay loam with sufficient amount of moisture.

Propagation.

Camias can be propagated by division of the rhizomes or root stock. They are planted at a distance of half a meter apart directly in the field which have been properly prepared.

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All About Fresh Flowers

Flowers are beautiful and professionally designed bouquets are especially attractive. Flowers can also carry huge sentimental meaning because they are often given as gifts from people close to us. So it’s little wonder that we would want to extend the life of our flowers and enjoy their aesthetic and sentimental beauty for as long as possible.

With proper care and attention most flowers will last around 7 days with some varieties lasting for as long as 14 days. Here are some practical steps to help extend the life of your cut flowers.

Get flowers into water

After only a short time out of water flowers will begin to dehydrate. Therefore it is essential to get flowers into a vase or container of water as quickly as possible. When you first get the flowers home use warm water, not cold or hot, as this is the quickest way to rehydrate the flowers. Warm water will also promote opening of the blooms as most flowers are shipped with the blooms in a closed or tight stage.

Technically speaking the optimum temperature is 37.5C (99.5F), which is roughly body temperature. At this temperature air bubbles, which may have formed in the stem, tend to breakup. Also water that is warmer than the surrounding air is more readily taken up by the flowers.

Change the water regularly

Try to change the water every two days. The flowers should be well hydrated by now so you can use cold water instead of warm. This helps keep the flowers cool which is a key part of keeping flowers in good condition.

Use flower preservatives

Each consignment of Affinity Flowers comes with a sachet of flower preservative. Flower preservative contains two main components, carbohydrates and anti-bacterial additives.

The carbohydrates act as food which helps to sustain the flowers. The carbohydrates will also stimulate flower heads to open quicker. This is handy when you’re trying to open flowers that usually ship with tight blooms like lilies.

The bactericide component inhibits bacteria developing in the water. Bacteria laden water will cause flowers to deteriorate quicker. Bacteria is also a problem because it can block flower stems and hinder the uptake of water. If left long enough the bacteria will also discolour the vase water and produce an unpleasant odour.

Simply empty the contents of the flower preservative sachet into the vase water.

If you don’t have flower preservative you could add 1-2 drops of bleach to the water instead. The bleach will act as an anti-bacterial just like the additives in commercial flower preservatives.

Remove leaves that will be under water

This is important as leaves that are below the waterline will deteriorate quickly and become a breeding ground for bacteria. If you have a professionally arranged bouquet you’ll find that the leaves have already been removed by the florist. But flowers bought loose or unarranged might still have leaves low on the stem.

Trim the stems

Take a pair of scissors or a sharp knife and trim 2-3cm (1 inch) from the bottom of the stem. Try not to crush the stem while you’re doing this. Cut the stem on an angle to increase the surface area exposed to the water. Cutting on an angle also stops the stem sitting flat on the bottom of the vase and blocking water uptake. Once cut immediately place the flowers into water.

Water is sucked up the stem like a straw. If there is anything blocking the straw then it will impede water flow to the head. Over time the end of a stem can become blocked with impurities from the water and bacteria. Also, if a flower has been out of water for any period of time, air will be drawn into the stem which will block its ability to draw water.

Some florists recommend cutting the stems underwater which prevents air being drawn up the stem.

Re-cut stems every two days or when you change the water.

Keep flowers cool

Flowers should be kept in cool conditions. Keep them away from direct sunlight, heaters, lamps and other heat sources. Also try not to leave flowers in a hot vehicle when transporting them. This is why specialist flower delivery couriers have chilled storage on-board their vehicles.

Each variety has its own optimal holding temperature but the ideal temperature for most flowers is a chilly 4-5C (39-41F), about the temperature inside your refrigerator. Obviously these aren’t ideal temperatures for people but if you really wanted to extend the life of your flowers you could place them in the refrigerator overnight or if you were going to be away for an extended period.

Keep flowers away from fruit

Fruit and vegetables produce ethylene gas which is detrimental to flowers. Carnations and Delphiniums are particularly susceptible. Try to keep flowers away from fruit and vegetables to keep them in good shape.

Similarly domestic gas is also damaging to flowers. There is a story of a flower grower who found it difficult to keep cut flowers on his farm. He suspected his gas supply may have been the cause and a check by a specialist confirmed he had a gas leak on his property.

Keep daffodils separate

The sap exuded from the cut stems of narcissus varieties like daffodils is detrimental to other flowers. No other flowers should share the same water with daffodils or any narcissus varieties.

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Guide To Make Dried Flowers

Want to make your garden’s summer flowers last all year? Ok, the easiest way is to bring your garden flowers indoor and dry them.

* First: Harvesting Flowers

It is best to cut your flowers in the morning hours after the dew has evaporated from the plants. Once cut, group stems into bunches using rubber bands (pure rubber rubber bands work best) and remove them from the sunlight as soon as possible.

There are definite developmental times which are best for cutting flowers for drying. This can be very specific for different plants or even different cultivators of the same plant. In general, it is best to pick immature flowers (ones that are not completely open) since flowers continue to open during the drying process. If you pick a flower at the time that it looks perfect, it will continue to open while drying, leaving you with a flower past that ‘perfect stage’. Most people pick flowers too late. For example, have you ever seen a pretty dried rose? If you really look at it, the flower is still fairly closed. Avoid harvesting flowers too mature in development. Such flowers will generally shed upon drying and will not hold up well in arrangements.

We offer specific picking and growing recommendations for each flower we grow. Just click on any dried flower name on any of our lists to obtain a wealth of specific information including pictures!

* Second: Preserving Flowers

With only a few exceptions, we air dry all our flowers. We simple hang flower bunches upside down on wire (over two miles of it is stretched in our circa 1860 barns). The barns offer ideal conditions: 1) darkness; 2) very good airflow; 3) cool updrafts; 4) perfect (usually) humidity levels. Once you have cut your flowers, it is important to remove them from the sunlight as soon as possible. This, along with drying in the dark, is the most important factor in maintaining good color.

Note:

1)How to Hang Flower Bunches

Suspend a 1/2-inch-diameter horizontal pole or pipe from the ceiling. If fastening hooks into your ceiling or walls is not an option, use tripods or two high-backed chairs to support the pole. A bent paper clip makes a perfect hanger for your bunches. Put newspaper or a drop cloth on the floor under the hanging bunches to catch fallen leaves, seeds, and petals. Hang bunches far enough apart to allow good air circulation.

2) How Long to Hang Flowers to Dry

The drying process takes from 10 to 20 days, depending on the plant. When dried, the stems should snap. You must test the flowers for dryness. Dissect one or two, and make sure the flowers” insides are thoroughly dry.

Some flowers, such as delphiniums, keep their color better if dried quickly near sources of warm air such as a heater. Large, many-flowered blooms such as dill, fluffy grasses, and Queen Anne”s lace, should be dried upright, not hanging upside down.

3) How to Dry Flowers with Silica?

Silica-gel drying is done in shallow, airtight, plastic (or glass) containers or trays. I dry many flowers at once using a 10- by 18-inch airtight plastic container. Yours need not be that big, but make sure that the flowers aren’t crowded. Spread the flowers out, face up, on a 1-inch (minimum depth) bed of crystals. Carefully spoon or sprinkle more silica on top until you’ve completely covered the flowers with at least another inch of crystals. Drying flowers with single-petal structures, such as daisies, facedown is another technique, but my results have been identical using both approaches. To dry flowers facedown, create a small mound for the flower head, place the flower head facedown on it, and add silica over the flower until it is covered. Flowers can be almost touching, and because similar kinds of flowers dry at the same rate, you may wish to group similar blooms in the same container. Seal the container, and don’t disturb it for three to four days.

Remove delicate blossoms very carefully. Shake or brush off the crystals lightly with a soft artist’s paintbrush. Leaving flowers in desiccant too long makes them very fragile, so remove flowers right away once you’ve determined that they’re dry enough.

4) How to Use Sand to Dry your Flowers?

Sand must be very fine, clean, dry, and preferably salt free. Sifting is recommended to remove coarse grains and foreign particles. Rinsing the sand in water several times to remove any soil is also recommended. Damp sand can be dried in an oven by placing in shallow pans and baking at 250 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes. Be sure to use only flowers in their prime and process them quickly to prevent wilting.

To dry with sand, place an inch or two of sand in a container; scoop away a small amount of sand to form a depression on the surface; place the flower head upright in this depression and press the sand in and around the outside of the flower to support it. Next, scoop a little sand into your hand and allow it to trickle in a fine stream around each petal. Start with the outer petals and work inward row by row, allowing the sand to build up equally on all sides of each petal so its position and shape are not altered. Flowers dried with sand are fragile so be very careful when removing them from the sand. Notice that flowers must be stored in a strong carton to protect the petals from breaking.

5) Using a Microwave Oven to Dry Flowers

The latest and fastest method to dry flowers is to use a combination of silica gel and a microwave oven.

With the use of a microwave, you can now dry your flowers very quickly. Flowers should be gathered at their peak or else they will turn brown. Use any of the drying agents (silica gel, sand, borax) in a container deep enough to cover the bloom. Leave a 1/2 inch stem on the flower, and place it face up on a 1/2 inch layer of drying agent. Carefully sprinkle enough agent to cover the flower, and place it in the microwave along with a small bowl of water. Do not remove the flowers from the agent immediately, but set them aside for several hours. Listed below are some times for drying flowers in a microwave.

By using air drying and other methods also, many flowers can be preserved for year-round enjoyment. Plan now to include some flowers in your garden for drying, and check nearby fields and road sides throughout the summer and fall for more dried plant materials.

* Third: Care of Dried Flowers

Routine dusting can be accomplished using a real feather duster or hair blow dryer on it’s lowest setting.

* Last: Storing and Enjoying Dried Flowers

We recommend wrapping the flowers in newspaper and placing them in a cardboard box. Do not store the box containing the dried flowers where it is unusually damp (some basements) or very dry (some attics). Also, a lot of people think you should never store dried flowers outside (it would be way to cold). This is simply not true. Temperatures are not important. In fact, a garage can be an ideal place for storing dried flowers. Actually, if your home is heated by forced air, the preferred place to store dried flowers would be in a outside building away from the dry heat.

In general, dried flowers should remain out of direct sunlight while you enjoy them in their final state. This will minimize fading over time. We also suggest not to place dried flowers in the path of forced air heat registers. This extremely dry air is very hard on dried flower structure (causes shattering).

Suggestion for use of dried flowers would include wreaths, swags, sheaths, bouquets, and sprays. Simply hanging dried flowers in a room can be very appealing. Also, placing clusters of bunches in a basket, as though you just came in from a garden, is most attractive.

Caution: if you do store your dried flowers outside, make sure you protect them from small rodents and insects (a few mothballs will work).

Finally, I should to say that drying flowers can be addictive! Before long, wreaths will adorn all your doors, and swags will hang from every wall. And they’ll all have come from your own garden. Talk about an extended season! You’ll soon see why dried flowers are often called “everlastings”.

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